Antibiotic use during peripartum period linked to greater risk of inflammatory condition in offspring

Posted by: | July 12, 2017 | Comments

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A study by researchers at the University of Chicago Medicine shows that when mice that are genetically susceptible to developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were given antibiotics during late pregnancy and the early nursing period, their offspring were more likely to develop an inflammatory condition of the colon that resembles human IBD.

The antibiotic treatment also caused lasting changes in the gut microbiome of mothers that were passed on to their offspring. While their offspring developed disease, adult mice given antibiotics did not see an increase in IBD. This suggests that the timing of antibiotic exposure is crucial, especially during the early developmental period after birth when the immune system is undergoing maturation.

“The newborn mice inherited a very altered, skewed population of microbes,” said Eugene B. Chang, MD, Martin Boyer Professor of Medicine at the University of Chicago, Director of the Microbiome Medicine Program of the Microbiome Center, and senior author of the study, published this week in the journal Cell Reports. “None of the mothers developed IBD, but even though they had the same genetic background, the offspring with an altered microbiome during this critical period of immune development became highly susceptible to the development of colitis.”

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