NIH scientists find microbes on the skin of mice promote tissue healing, immunity

Posted by: | January 24, 2018 | Comments

Immunofluorescent image of immune cells surrounding a skin wound, enriched in the beneficial bacteria S. epidermidis. NIAID

Insights may inform wound management techniques.

Beneficial bacteria (link is external) on the skin of lab mice work with the animals’ immune systems to defend against disease-causing microbes and accelerate wound healing, according to new research from scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. Researchers say untangling similar mechanisms in humans may improve approaches to managing skin wounds and treating other damaged tissues. The study was published online today in Cell.

Like humans and other mammals, mice are inhabited by large, diverse microbial populations collectively called the microbiome. While the microbiome is believed to have many beneficial functions across several organ systems, little is known about how the immune system responds to these harmless bacteria.

Read more at: NIH






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