Chondroitin sulfate disaccharides modified the structure and function of the murine gut microbiome under healthy and stressed conditions

Posted by: | August 2, 2017 | Comments

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CS disaccharides may enhance intestinal absorption and promote kidney function.

The mice experiencing exhaustive exercise stress had a significantly lowered body weight and feed intake as expected (Fig. 1). One day after exhaustive exercise, the mice had a significant reduction in feed intake (P < 0.01). After a short period of adaptation, the feed intake started to bounce back in the mice experiencing the stress. A notable decrease in body weight in the mice with the stress was seen after day 3 (P < 0.05). This reduction in body weight remained significant during the much of experimental duration until the conclusion of the experiment at day 16. The exercise stressed mice supplemented with CS disaccharides for 16 days did not appear to have a notable effect on both bodyweight and feed intake. Neither did CS disaccharides affect these two physiological parameters in healthy mice (Fig. 1). However, the exercise stress resulted in a 39% reduction in intestinal villus length, from 1154.8 µm in the healthy mice to 707.4 µm in the stressed mice (P < 0.01; Fig. 2) while intestinal crypt depth was not significantly impacted (data not shown). As a result, the stress significantly altered the villus to crypt ratio (V/C, Fig. 2). Intriguingly, the stressed mice supplemented with CS disaccharides for 16 days had a significant increase in both villus length (P < 0.01) and V/C ratio (P < 0.05). CS disaccharides supplementation was able to restore repressed villus length from 707.4 µm in the stressed mice to the baseline level observed in the healthy mice (1062.6 µm, P < 0.05), suggesting that CS disaccharides may have potential to increase intestinal absorption.

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