Gut bacteria from multiple sclerosis patients modulate human T cells and exacerbate symptoms in mouse models

Posted by: | November 17, 2017 | Comments

ABSTRACT

We have experimentally investigated the immunoregulatory effects of human gut microbiota in multiple sclerosis (MS). We have identified specific bacteria that are associated with MS and demonstrated that these bacteria regulate T lymphocyte-mediated adaptive immune responses and contribute to the proinflammatory environment in vitro and in vivo. Thus, our results expand the knowledge of the microbial regulation of immunity and may provide a basis for the development of microbiome-based therapeutics in autoimmune diseases.

Read more at: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the U.S.A.

Egle Cekanaviciute, Bryan B. Yoo, Tessel F. Runia, Justine W. Debelius, Sneha Singh, Charlotte A. Nelson, Rachel Kanner, Yadira Bencosme, Yun Kyung Lee, Stephen L. Hauser, Elizabeth Crabtree-Hartman, Ilana Katz Sand, Mar Gacias, Yunjiao Zhu, Patrizia Casaccia, Bruce A. C. Cree, Rob Knight, Sarkis K. Mazmanian, and Sergio E. Baranzini. Gut bacteria from multiple sclerosis patients modulate human T cells and exacerbate symptoms in mouse models. PNAS 2017 114 (40) 10713-10718; published ahead of print September 11, 2017, doi:10.1073/pnas.1711235114





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