Removal of the cecum affects intestinal fermentation, enteric bacterial community structure, and acute colitis in mice

Posted by: | December 15, 2017 | Comments

ABSTRACT

The murine cecum is a major site of fermentation of dietary materials, and production of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs). To examine the role that the cecum plays in acute bacterial infection in mice, the cecum was surgically removed, and changes in bacterial communities and production of SCFAs were analyzed relative to surgical sham animals. To incite bacterial colitis, mice were orally challenged with Citrobacter rodentium. The impact of butyrate administered directly into the colon was also examined.

Read more at: Taylor & Francis Online

Brown, Kirsty, Abbott, D. Wade, Uwiera, Richard R.E., Inglis, G. Douglas. (2017). Removal of the cecum affects intestinal fermentation, enteric bacterial community structure, and acute colitis in mice. Taylor & Francis. doi: 10.1080/19490976.2017.1408763.





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