Mice eating SH1 get sick

Posted by: | September 21, 2023 | Comments

Bart’s MS Blog

Berer K, Gerdes LA, Cekanaviciute E, Jia X, Xiao L, Xia Z, Liu C, Klotz L, Stauffer U, Baranzini SE, Kümpfel T, Hohlfeld R, Krishnamoorthy G, Wekerle H.Gut microbiota from multiple sclerosis patients enables spontaneous autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2017. pii: 201711233.

There is emerging evidence that the commensal microbiota has a role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), a putative autoimmune disease of the CNS. Here, we compared the gut microbial composition of 34 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for MS. While there were no major differences in the overall microbial profiles, we found a significant increase in some taxa such as Akkermansia in untreated MS twins. Furthermore, most notably, when transplanted to a transgenic mouse model of spontaneous brain autoimmunity, MS twin-derived microbiota induced a significantly higher incidence of autoimmunity than the healthy twin-derived microbiota. The microbial profiles of the colonized mice showed a high intraindividual and remarkable temporal stability with several differences, including Sutterella, an organism shown to induce a protective immunoregulatory profile in vitro. Immune cells from mouse recipients of MS-twin samples produced less IL-10 than immune cells from mice colonized with healthy-twin samples. IL-10 may have a regulatory role in spontaneous CNS autoimmunity, as neutralization of the cytokine in mice colonized with healthy-twin faecal samples increased disease incidence. These findings provide evidence that MS-derived microbiota contain factors that precipitate an MS-like autoimmune disease in a transgenic mouse model. They hence encourage the detailed search for protective and pathogenic microbial components in human MS.

There is a suggestion that gut bacteria can influence the immune response and may participate in the development of MS. In this study they look at twins where one has MS and the other has not developed MS. They had comparable levels of CD4, Th17 and T regs…so haven’t read our paper then:-)

Memory B Cells are Major Targets for Effective Immunotherapy in Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis. (if you haven’t read it give it a go)

They looked at the microbiome in MS twins and healthy twins and they exhibited comparable microbial community richness (alpha diversity). But if the MS was untreated apparently, people had more Akkermansia, which have been suggested to be regulatory.

Read More At: Bart’s MS Blog






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