A mouse’s metabolism may follow circadian rhythms set by gut bacteria

Posted by: | October 14, 2019 | Comments

Bacteria in the small intestine of mice may set the clock on the animals’ metabolic rhythms.

Mice (and maybe people) may metabolize food according to daily, circadian rhythms set by gut bacteria.

Microbes in the small intestine of mice rhythmically dictate when fat is taken up by cells that line the organ, researchers report. The study, described in the Sept. 27 Science, details how gut microbes influence a host’s metabolism. If the findings carry over to people, the research may give clues to why jet lag and night-shift work, which can throw off circadian rhythms, often lead to obesity, diabetes and other health problems.

Researchers knew that human cells have molecular clocks that time 24-hour circadian cycles of metabolism (SN: 11/8/18), and that gut microbes in the colon follow their hosts’ biological beat (SN: 10/16/14). But the new study finds that, at least in the small intestine, microbes can set rhythms for host cells to follow. That work was done in mice, but the process may work similarly in people.

Read more at Science News






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